#strokerecovery tweetchats 4pm London Time 13th January 2015 – Here’s why……..

Stroke is global healthcare problem. In developed countries, it is the third or fourth most common cause of death.  However as 80% or more people now survive the initial stroke, the largest effect of stroke is through the long-term residual difficulties, daily living activity limitations and reduced social participation/interactivity.  Stroke is the main cause of adult disability.  Physical and emotional  impairments from stroke affect the whole family, not just the person with stroke.

Most stroke survivors and their families want get on with the rest of their lives after stroke —in other words their goal is #strokerecovery. This doesn’t not mean the stroke survivor or family will fully recover like they were pre-stroke. Rather, our #strokerecovery tweetchat aims to practically advise, help and inspire people to make progress in the daily living activities, socially and professionally.   This includes motor, communicative, cognitive and emotional recovery. In other words, it is possible for  stroke survivors and their families can live satisfying lives with impairments.

What is #strokerecovery ?

#strokerecovery is a vibrant community of people interested in exploring stroke recovery in for themselves and in stroke recovery. Sharing, learning & improving from each other.

Our first chat is held on 13th January 2015 at 4pm London time.

Why #strokerecovery ?

Fighting Strokes is a global patient advocate charity which was founded primarily to help inspire and support anyone affected by stroke. We try to help people make progress improvement both physically and emotionally. We also have a special interest in inspiring families and patients affected by brainstem stroke and diagnosed with locked in syndrome to improve.  See here Fighting Strokes.

Who takes part in #strokerecovery ?

Anyone and everyone delivering and receiving health care who is interested in open conversation to help improve quality, access, value and effectiveness of stroke recovery. This includes: patients, caregivers, patient advocates, healthcare professionals, not-for-profit health organisations, educators, heath content providers, health institutions, health administrators, health systems and networks, government and health policy makers.

Join us.

How to take part in #strokerecovery tweet chats.

  1. Get a Twitter account!!
  2. Go to twubs.com or tweetchat.com.
  3. Enter the #strokerecovery in the box that says “Enter a hashtag” and press Enter.
  4. Sign in to participate in the chat. (note the hashtag #strokerecovery will automatically be added to your tweets.
  5. Review this week’s topics.
  6. Be online at 4 pm London time on the 13th of each month.
  7. Chat!

Our next tweet chat will discuss:

T2: What the strengths are in our current #strokerecovery systems?

T3: What are the weaknesses in the current #strokerecovery systems?

T4: What should we concentrate on in the initial Tweetchats? 

Tweet Chat Etiquette

  1. At the beginning of the Tweetchat or when you join, briefly introduce yourself.
  2. Please use #strokerecovery in your tweet.
  3. The Tweetchat will be for active for 1 hour, but you can add to the Tweetchat transcript by including #strokerecovery in your posts between chats.
  4. The moderator will introduce the questions. Please respond to the current questions.
  5. You can respond and add to others posts by replying or favouring.
  6. Be kind to others and have fun.
  7. Suggest future tweet chats if you like ?

We are including several academic papers for your information. They include evidence based reviews on motor, communication, and cognitive recovery and Aura Kagan and colleagues (2008) framework for “Counting what Counts” in #strokerecovery.

Motor recovery

Peter Langhorne, Fiona Coupar, and  Alex Pollock (2009)  separated motor recovery into three areas:

  1. Upper-limb movement and function/arm and hand function;
  2. Lower-limb movement and function /Walking ability
  3. Balance
  4. Mobility (which combines upper-limb function, lower-limb function, and balance to enable normal movements) also been defined as
    1. ‘activity of moving from place to place, generally by walking or using a wheelchair’ (Busman & Stam, 1998)’
    2. ‘an individual’s ability to move about effectively in his surroundings’ (The WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001); or
    3. ‘Stroke- mobility’ –‘Out-of bed physical activity, which may include transferring on or off the toilet, sitting out of bed, standing and walking’ (Bernardt et al., 2009).

Communication recovery

Koenig-Bruhin and colleagues (2013) note that this is mainly referred to as aphasia recovery (language), but includes many different functions, such as verbal communication and activities involving daily life and self-organisation.

The vast majority of aphasia patients have the potential to recover, if they do not suffer from dementia. In the acute phase, different types of therapy have their merits, including group therapies or treatment involving families, but they:

  • must be adapted to the type of aphasia;
  • must be adapted to the patient; and
  • often require a minimum of intensity (between three sessions per week and once a day during the acute phase) and of duration (at least three months).

Focused interventions in the chronic phase have also demonstrated their effectiveness.

Cognitive recovery

Many survivors of stroke complain about cognitive impairments, such as attentional impairments, diminished concentration, memory loss, and mental slowness (brain fog) yet Loetscher & Lincoln’s (2013) review of cognitive rehabilitation concluded that effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation remains unconfirmed.

Emotional recovery

‘If the part of your brain that normally controls your emotions becomes damaged by a stroke, the result can be a change in how you think, feel or behave. Don’t be surprised if you feel anxious, depressed, frustrated, angry or bewildered. Emotions tend be depression, anxiety, emotionalism, personality changes and anger.’ The Stroke Association. We can try to help our emotional #strokerecovery by:

  • Letting go of rejection
  • Avoid ruminating
  • Turn failure into something positive
  • Avoid letting guilt linger
  • Using positive affirmations to counter low self esteem *

Counting what Counts

Focus groups with a range of stakeholders including health professionals, stroke survivors, and their families highlighted the need to focus on real-life outcomes. They indicated that existing classifications and models were not necessarily accessible and/or user friendly for clinicians, researchers, policy makers, funders, and those living with aphasia.

Tweet Chat Timezones:

Add to calendar

Location Local time Time zone UTC offset
Edmonton (Canada – Alberta) Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 9 :00:00 AM MST UTC-7 hours
London (United Kingdom – England) Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 4 :00:00 PM GMT UTC
Perth (Australia – Western Australia) Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 12 :00:00 am AWST UTC+8 hours
Corresponding UTC (GMT) Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 16:00:00

Check World Clock for the corresponding times for your location: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/

By @kateallatt

NEW EBOOK!

I Am Still The Same -Self help stroke recovery tool

Internationally published author ‘Running Free’ (Amazon) .  Speaker –   Founder Fighting Strokes

References

Bussmann JB, Stam HJ. Techniques for measurement and assessment of mobility in rehabilitation: a theoretical approach. Clin Rehabil 1998;12:455–64.

Bernhardt J, Thuy MNT, Collier JM, Legg LA. Very early versus delayed mobilisation after stroke. Cochrane Db Syst Rev 2009, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD006187. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006187.pub2

Kagan, A.Simmons-Mackie, N.Rowland, A., (…),Threats, T.Sharp, S. Counting what counts: A framework for capturing real-life outcomes of aphasia intervention  Aphasiology 2008; 22(3): 244-53

Koenig-Bruhin, M.  Kolonko, B.At, A.Annoni, J.-M.Hunziker, E.   Aphasia following a stroke: Recovery and recommendations for rehabilitation  (Review) Schweizer Archiv fur Neurologie und Psychiatrie 2013; 164(8):292-298

Loetscher, T.Lincoln, N.B.   Cognitive rehabilitation for attention deficits following stroke.  (Review) The Cochrane database of systematic reviews 2013; 5: CD002842

* http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/08/15/emotional-pain-recovery-tips.aspx – As the featured article reported, Guy Winch, author of Emotional First Aid: Practical Strategies for Treating Failure, Rejection, Guilt and Other Everyday Psychological Injuries, recently shared five tips for healing your emotional pain.

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